Federer Serve vs. Cilic GAME POINT

Federer’s Serve vs. Cilic in the 2018 Australian Open was sensational.  The following chart displays where Federer chose to serve on GAME POINT of each Serve Game in the match vs. Cilic.

Federer served a total of 23 Game Points on his Serve.  He won 21 of those Game Points.

In the 2nd Set Tiebreaker, Federer served 6 points, winning 4 of those points.

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Federer served 3 Inside Run Serves, he was 1/1 from the Deuce Court and 1/2 from AD Court.  Federer served 3 Outside Run Serves, he was 2/2 from Deuce Court and 0/1 from AD Court.  These two mini-breaks of serve by Cilic was enough to win the 2nd Set Tiebreaker 7-5.  Notice that Federer did not hit a Cage Serve in the Tiebreaker.

Federer hit 134 successful serves in the entire match vs. Cilic.  Here’s the breakdown of Inside Run/Cage/Outside Run Serves.

Federer’s winning % for the match was 72% (97/134) – 3 double faults in the match were not counted in the data here, these are strictly made serves in the match and their corresponding location.

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This great information in the fact that Federer was unpredictable with his serve placement overall in the match and he only choose hit 20/134 (15%) Cage Serves into the body of Cilic, and 0% in the tiebreaker set.

Now to the most important analytics, where did Federer play his Serve on GAME POINT!  Here we go ->

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Federer won 8/9 Serves on GAME POINT when he hit an Inside Run Serve.

He won 3/3 on the IR Serve to Cilic’s Backhand in the Deuce Court.

He won 5/6 on the IR Serve to Cilic’s Forehand in the AD Court.

IRunServe

Federer won 10/12 Serves on GAME POINT when he hit an Outside Run Serve.

He won 3/3 on the OR Serve to Cilic’s Forehand in the Deuce Court.

He won 7/9 on the OR Serve to Cilic’s Backhand in the AD Court.

ORunServe

He was 2/2 when Fed chose on GAME POINT to serve to the body of Cilic (Cage Serve).

ServeCages

Next is the breakdown of # of hits per point on GAME POINT when Federer was Serving.

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As you can see, Fed was accurate when it was GAME POINT on his serve, focus level very high.  He was broken 2x during the 5 set match, one time in the 6th game of the 4th Set, rally length was 4 shots.  The other service break was in the same 4th Set, the 8th game, the rally length was 8 shots.

The 7 out of 11 games he won ended either on a rally length of 1 or 3 (0-4 shots).

64% of GAME POINTS when Roger was Serving ended in the First Strike phase of the point.

 

One of the main focuses of Transforming the Practice Court is players spend a lot of time on the Serve and the S1 (+1 FH or BH after the Serve).  I’m finding the more time players spend on this sequence in practice, they are demonstrating higher levels of performance on these 2 shots in match play with regards to 3 main areas:

  • Focus
  • Familiarity (resetting better after the Serve to play the S1
  • Knowledge (self-aware that approximately 6 out of 10 match points end here)

 

Link to Serve/S1 practice (medicine ball & shadowing serve)

Link to Serve/S1 practice (court)

Link to Serve/S1BH practice (wall)

Link to Serve/S1FH practice (wall)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Setting Goals to the Present Moment

As you begin a new year, setting new goals is always exciting.  Something to think about is mapping those goals to the present moment.  The main objective is to achieve each goal within a certain time frame, this is typically the most difficult thing to do.  So many distractions can keep you from getting what you want.  Here is a brief outline of how to look at setting your goals towards the present moment and fulfill each one of them daily.

goal-setting-photo

 

Start with a:

Someday Goal :  What’s the ONE thing I want to do someday?

Five-Year Goal :   This goal is based on the “someday” goal.  What’s the ONE thing I like to do in the next five years?

One-Year Goal:  This goal is based on the “five-year” goal.  What’s the ONE thing I can do this year?

Monthly Goal:  Based on the “one-year” goal.  What’s the ONE thing I can do this month?

Weekly Goal:  From the “monthly” goal, what’s the ONE thing I can accomplish this week?

Daily Goal:  From the “weekly” goal, what’s the ONE thing I can accomplish today?

 

how to make a goal a reality

 

The best way to accomplish your BIG goals is to reverse engineer the goal and then break it down into pieces that fit together like a jig-saw puzzle.  After making your list of the “pieces” that make up the BIG picture (goal), you could prioritize them if you’d like or sometimes if you just get started on laying one piece down (do a small task), you’ll find that the organizing starts to fall in place more automatically.  Getting started is the hardest step to take, and then momentum takes over and you’ll be on your way.

Writing these all down with PEN and PAPER is a powerful exercise to tackle first, then transcribe your notes to digital form to stay organized (if you choose).  I have a daily journal that I write all my thoughts in and these ideas turn into projects and from there I begin to reverse engineer them into smaller tasks.

 

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Sometimes you just need someone to brainstorm your ideas with, if that’s the case, go for it!  The only thing holding you back from getting what you want is YOU!  So, take a leap of faith, contact a friend or colleague that will help you through your thought process by listening and asking objective questions to lead you towards more detail of what you really what to achieve.

All the best in 2018!

Styrling

 

 

Depth Rally Challenge

I’d like to take the time to address the mindset of the player as they approach challenges.  Challenges, better known as drills to most players and coaches, are beneficial towards the open-ended discovery of how players react and respond to play.  It’s a time where coaches can observe a player in a more realistic situation to hit a target or zone of the court as well as give the player a chance to perform under certain parameters. When practicing challenges (drills) to improve as a player, there a three areas of discovery to best manage them.  First, know that the initial moment will most often seem awkward.  When you begin these on-court strategies there needs to be a mental and emotional commitment.  It can certainly be frustrating sometimes when given a challenge that is beyond our comfort zone and pushes us to our athletic and psychological limits.  Starting with a growth mindset, meaning to become stronger in mind, body, and emotions, will help you see more value in the journey towards performance than just the goal of winning points alone.  For a player to execute a shot or sequence in a live match scenario, they mainly need to do most or all of the following:

1.  Develop the technique of a skill

2.  Gain a level of mastery in a closed challenge

3.  Gain a level of mastery in a limited open challenge

4.  Show confidence in a practice match situation

5.  Display automaticity (automatic rhythm response) in a live point play situation

One of the most important challenges that I have players perform is called the “Depth Challenge”. It’s a challenge that promotes a sustained rally with an emphasis on keeping the ball deep in the backcourt and I usually begin a practice session with this one.  I must give credit to Carl Maes, former coach of Kim Clijsters, for the inspiration with this challenge.  I met Carl at the 2016 PTR International Symposium and we had a chance to talk about training players.  He shared some great stories about Kim and his coaching experience with her.  He reminded me that if consistency was King (making shots), then depth of shot was the Diamond.  So, I came back home and created a challenge for my players, it’s made a world of difference and putting it first as a warm-up has launched my players to new levels of deliberate focus from beginning to building a point.

The Depth Challenge begins with me taking two yellow throw-down long lines, http://www.oncourtoffcourt.com, and placing them 6 feet inside the baseline.  The challenge consist of 3 players per court, 2 players vs. 1 player.  The 2 players are on the side with the throw-down lines and their goal is to keep the rally sustained and tally the total number of points scored by the single player in a 3 minute time frame.  The single player scores 3 points for a ball landing between the yellow throw-down lines and the baseline, 1 point for a ball landing between the service line and the yellow throw-down lines.  0 points for anywhere else (service boxes or out of bounds).  Each court has 3 players on our team of 12 players spanning 4 courts.  Each court competes for the high score of the day.   My greatest testimony of this challenge is that it has built incredible team spirit between all the players.  The expectation of each player to focus and score a high number for their team increases each and every day.  There are personal best scores tallied each week and posted on the team board.  It’s a confidence builder for every player when they beat their personal best as well as strive to be the high score for the team.  This challenge is certainly not limited to teams, I use it in a similar way with individual players and they keep a tally of their scores each week in their tennis journals as a way to reflect on their training and progress.  The Depth Challenge is fun and engages the player’s focus to play each ball with a higher purpose than just “getting it back in the court”.  It’s powerful, intentional, serious fun!

As a player beginning a new challenge, you may struggle at first.  But that tension and struggle is what leads you to discover your skill level with a particular stroke or better court positioning to successfully execute on a more regular basis.  This discovery of your skill level will guide to the second area which is stepping back and learning the skill in a more closed challenge.  Practicing through deliberately repeating the skill, for example, spotting the part of the ball you’d like to strike, examining your ideal strike zone, or playing to a specific section or zone of the court.  Many times we are not sure which skill to practice until we actually play a point in a drill that pushes the limits of our ability.  After spending some time practicing the skill, revisiting a limited open challenge at this point will hopefully lead to more success in performance.  As a player, once you reach a mastery level in the limited open challenge, then the third area is the challenge level must be increased to match the level of your improved skill.  Players who engage better with drills and challenges from coaches are better equipped.  Coaches who understand appropriate levels of challenge for mastery help players improve more quickly.  Observing your player(s) as they perform these choreographed challenges, a drop in the level of performance as a result of disinterest may occur.  Yes, boredom can set in fast with players once they have achieved a high level of success with the particular challenge given to them.  This is where the rubber can meet the road with respect to being a good coach or a great coach.  Bill and I have had many heartfelt discussions around this topic of being able to activate enough self-awareness as a coach to observe your player(s) well.  It is quite difficult to be reflective and keep an athlete-centered perspective when training a player to experience their best play state.  There can be a varied of reasons why we care, sometimes we care about our image as a coach and I totally get that.  But what I believe is a higher priority and one held by many coaches worldwide is we care deeply about our players and their character development on and off the court.  Another area of player development is the confidence factor.  Challenges that reflect actual point play situations in practice are a perfect way to gain confidence.  Confidence is that feeling or belief that one can rely on when the pressure escalates, and a well-designed challenge is a great opportunity to help a player learn to trust their instincts.  As a coach, one of the ways I’ve seen players excel in this area of confidence is letting them know that I believe in them as their coach.  Allistair McCaw is a champion coach in this area of promoting encouragement towards players on a daily basis.  Visit him at:   http://www.mccawmethod.com.  I love Allistair’s attitude toward this important and simple approach of deliberately saying to a player, “I Believe In You!”  What a powerful statement to inspire confidence in the hearts and minds of players, no matter what their age may be.  Especially our young players to which no other sport in the world ask them to be their own referee, maintain the correct score, keep a stellar attitude, and stay focused under all kinds of pressure from their opponent, themselves, coaches, spectators, friends and family.  The call to be great is a high one to say the least, from both a player and coach role.  Communication is a two-way street made up of both speaking and listening.  The greatest leaders are the ones who wait and listen first and then last to speak and give their perspective and direction.  They practice the opportunity to allow others a spacious place to grow and mature, understanding that we all have the ability to play our best if given enough room to do so.

Why do You Play?

Below is an excerpt from the Chapter “Why do You Play?” in my new book 7 On Court Strategies to Experience Your Play State.  I explore the idea of winning EVERY TIME You Play in this book – pick up your copy today Click here at Amazon.com

 

Play is often talked about as if it were a relief from serious learning. But for children, play is serious learning. Play is really the work of childhood. 

                                            –  Fred Rogers

 

Why do you play? There are varied reasons why you may play the game of tennis. Some of us play for the simple enjoyment to interact with friends and family, others for competition and physical exercise, and then some of us play to relax and release the tension and pressure from our jobs or school. For whatever reason you decide to play tennis, it always leads to keeping score with someone winning and someone losing. Sometimes you win because you are more skilled than the other player, other times it may be a combination of being stronger mentally and emotionally than your opponent. Whatever way you happen to win in the score, being self-aware of how you win is rarely as valuable as the self-awareness gained when you lose on the scoreboard. My confidence in this statement is from observing players who win and lose and observing how they respond to each result. My belief is founded on the idea that winning and losing in the score can actually reveal the ‘why’ in playing the game.

Here is a fascinating quote from a recent article by Craig O’Shannessy July 2016 titled, The Percentages That Separate Djokovic And The Top 10:

An Infosys ATP Beyond The Numbers analysis shows that the current players in the Top 10 of the Emirates ATP Rankings have won, on average, just 53.2 per cent of their points the 2016 season. The flip side of the coin is also sobering to contemplate: Top 10 players average losing 47 per cent of all the points they play.

Reflecting on this data, if some of the greatest players in the World are losing 47 per cent of all the points they play, then defining why one plays the game is important. There is certainly more players losing tennis matches than winning them. In a tournament draw of 64 players, there are 63 players losing and one player winning. Why and how a player responds when losing points and matches is an important question to ponder in a quest to discover and advance toward growing and improving their game. The tension of losing can change or form the why, when, and how to play again because it gives a player the opportunity to explore more options for improvement to win more often. The key is to find ways to play that will really add to your enjoyment of the sport and the value of the lessons that can be learned from tennis. You will win and lose points like a roller coaster ride drifting up and down the track. The most important thing to realize is how you respond when you lose points because there will be a lot of them in playing this game. The first idea to grasp is your response to losing will determine how much and how often you win.    

 

The words printed here are concepts.  You must go through the experiences.
– St. Augustine

 

Take a moment to reflect on the last tennis match you lost. How long did you reflect on the match afterward? How many times did you lose that match – once, twice, three times in your mind? How would you describe your mental state after losing? Do you easily get over losing and move on to the next thing without much thought, or does losing torment you to some degree? Whichever way you slice it, coming to a point of simple and objective reflection can really help and become the catalyst for growth. I would say that some amount of agony over losing serves as a form of motivational energy. Also, you don’t have to lose in order to improve. Even in winning you can reflect on points or games that were lost and then create objectives for training so that more points are won moving forward. In fact, I love to win more than I hate to lose. A champion’s mindset is exemplified through a consistent effort to become the best version of themselves on and off the court.

In an evenly played match, you may win very close to the same amount of points that you lose. If you win 55% of the points, you will win 99% of the time with the exception being losing close sets, while winning relative blow out sets.

 

The idea being that winning by a little can lead to winning a lot.

 

Taking the time to separate the losing points versus winning points can make a huge difference in moving forward in the game. You will lose as many points as you win, there will be times you are up or down in the game.

To give a bit of a preview of the value of this book, I am sharing some strategies to help keep you in the moment and enjoying the game. The strategy of ‘Ball-Player’ in the pages ahead explain how to shift your visual perspective in the present moment. Being in the present moment is the key to unlocking your best performances. ‘Spot on the Ball’ is a challenge of awareness to experience the art of visualizing where you want to contact the ball to control trajectory and direction of your shot. Play Patterns That Run, Reverse, and Cage is a chapter about how combinations of shots tell a story of how the match is playing out. Once the story is understood, then maintaining the same story or changing to a new plot becomes more realistic. Stories have beginnings, building parts, and finishing pieces. If someone asks how did you play that match the other day, you could recall the match in story-form. ‘1-2, Reset’ is a challenge to experience how to let the previous shot go, then immediately shift attention onto the next shot in a two-ball sequence. As a player, you will learn to see in the immediate present, neither thinking about the past or focusing too far into the future.

K.Juvan Wins Girls 18s Orange Bowl Championships – How did she do it?

Kaja Juvan (SLO) won the Girls’ 18s singles at the Metropolia Orange Bowl International Championships stifling top seed and No. 1-ranked Russian Anastasia Potapova 6-1, 6-4.  The ITF Grade A, USTA Level 1 tournament is the showplace where the best junior players in the world come to battle for the coveted trophy.

The 55th Annual Junior Orange Bowl International Tennis Championship is one of the most distinguished and paramount junior tennis tournaments in the world! This globally recognized event brings together over 1,500 of the top ranked male and female junior players representing more than 76 countries.  Over the past 55 years, tennis legends such as Chris Evert, Jimmy Conners, Mary Joe Fernandez, Monica Seles, Andre Agassi and Steffi Graf have showcased their athletic talent as well as current pros, Caroline Wozniacki, Genie Bouchard, Maria Sharapova, Sloane Stevens, Roger Federer, Juan Martin del Potro, Kei Nishikori, and Andy Murray2012 Olympic and 2013 Men’s Wimbledon Champion.  As Kaja Juvan adds her name to this prestigious list of Orange Bowl champions, I’m sure she is looking forward to continuing her dreams of becoming the best she can be on the Pro Tour!

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Kaja Juvan 2016 Girls’ 18 Singles Champion

How did she do it?  Beating the #1 seed Potapova in straight sets 6-1, 6-4 was in no way an easy task.  My analysis of her match is based on a Point Tracking Chart I developed 4 years ago while tracking the length of points in junior tennis matches and tournaments.  It is evident when analyzing the numbers that Juvan was well-prepared in the First Strike Phase (0-4 shots) going into the Finals this year.  Breaking down and going beyond the numbers to get a glimpse into what led to her stunning victory is where we go next.

I’d like to add that this match was played on a “wet” clay court surface on December 11, 2016.  The numbers here were collected using the Point Tracking Chart, successfully mapping the length of each point.  Thanks to my friend and colleague Todd Nassief for the data entry.

Juvan played an absolutely flawless 1st set by winning 75% of the First Strike points (0-4 shots) when returning serve.  Here are the numbers:

Return of Serve – 1st Set

(0-4)  6-8  75% pts won

(5-8)  2-4  50% pts won

(+9)  1-1  100% pts won

In the 0-8 shots (First Strike Tennis and Patterns of Play), Juvan won 8 out of 12 points in these point phases winning 67% of the points.  I’m beginning with the Return of Serve numbers because this led to a big confidence booster for Juvan in the 1st set.  Putting pressure on the #1 seed’s serve right out of the gate set the tone for the Slovenian to storm through and break serve in the 2nd and 4th game of the set.

Serving in the 1st set was equally as lethal, Juvan won 9 out of 14 points in the First Strike phase projecting a commanding presence starting the point.

Serve – 1st Set

(0-4)  9-14  64% pts won

(5-8)  3-3  100% pts won

(+9)  4-4  100% pts won

 Juvan was perfect in the Patterns of Play (5-8) and Extended Rally (+9) phases, 100% pts won.  In the 0-8 shots, she won 12-17 points for 71%.  So what are these numbers really telling us?  Kaja Juvan was simply the better player between 0-8 shots in the first set, either serving or returning serve, she was on fire right out of the gate.  As my good friend and colleague Craig O’Shannessy http://www.braingametennis.com, lead analyst for the ATP Tour, says “Just when you think the point is beginning, it’s about to end, and that’s where all the action is!”  As you can see from these numbers, it’s exactly where all the action was played as well in the 2016 Girls’ 18s Final at the Orange Bowl.

After wining the 1st set 6-1, with a commanding lead Juvan took this great confidence into the 2nd set where her percentages may have dipped a little but her ability to keep the numbers above 50% in all three phases launched her towards victory.

kajajuvan4hgr7uds5gem

Juvan continued with a solid performance by applying pressure to Potavova’s service games in the 0-8 shots (21-33), winning 64% of the points played when returning.  Even though Juvan had a lower winning percentage in the +9 shot phase, she overwhelmed her opponent by winning the majority of points in the (0-4) and (5-8) shot phases.

Return of Serve – 2nd Set

(0-4)  14-23  61% pts won

(5-8)  7-10  70% pts won

(+9)  5-13  38% pts won

Serving in the 2nd Set, Juvan stumbled just a little on the Serve and S+1, winning just 53% and 50% of the points there, but was able to make up the difference once the point reached the extended rally phase by winning 63% of the points.

Serve – 2nd Set

(0-4)  8-15  53% pts won

(5-8)  5-10  50% pts won

(+9)  5-8  63% pts won

Winning 52% of the points in the (0-8) shot phases when serving and combined with her performance when returning was enough to finish the match with a win.  One of the keys to victory for Juvan was when leading 5-4 in the 2nd set and now serving for the match.  The 10th and final game was tracked and looked like this:

Point 1:  11 shots  (15-0)

Point 2:  13 shots  (30-0)

Point 3:  5 shots  (40-0)

Point 4:  3 shots (Game)

My sense after looking at the numbers of the 9th game, which lasted 10 points total, was that Potavova was trying to stretch out the rally length of points while hoping for a downtick in Juvan’s confidence and focus to finish the match.  But Juvan was able to maintain her focus out of a long point (+9) to the next short point that would ultimately land in the (0-4) shot phase.

I really enjoyed going through the numbers of this incredible match and found that player’s who train on the practice court like they will eventually play on the match court, find more wins, more often when it counts the most.  Handling the pressure of beginning a point well is a key factor to becoming one of the best players in the world.

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Drilling Deeper Beyond The Numbers

The first 4 shots are made up of the Serve and S+1, the Return and R+1.  The next two shots that a player plays is the S+2 and S+3 when serving.  The R+2 and R+3 when returning.  Here’s a chart to help see this a bit clearer:

Serve (1-shot)          Return (2-shot)

S+1 (3-shot)              R+1  (4-shot)

S+2 (5-shot)             R+2  (6-shot)

S+3 (7-shot)             R+3 (8-shot)

The shots played from the Serve player are the odd numbers:  1,3,5,7

The shots played from the Return player are the even numbers:  2,4,6,8

I found that even as well as Juvan played, there were places of improvement in her game.  Exactly “where” the adjustments and improvements can be made are found when drilling deeper beyond the numbers in this match.

The 1st set Juvan played was practically flawless in the (0-4) and (5-8) phases, as stated before winning 10-12 points when returning serve and 9-14 points when serving.  Total 19-26 points in the 1st set.  I’d like to focus more though on the 2nd set because the final set score was 6-4.  Here’s a closer look towards exactly where the errors (forced or unforced) showed up.

Return of Serve – 2nd Set

Return:  5 errors

 R+1:  4 errors

R+2:  2 errors

R+3:  1 error

Serve – 2nd Set

Serve:  1 DF

S+1:  5 errors

S+2:  1 error

S+3:  4 errors

Juvan returning serve in the 2nd set made the majority of errors (9-12) on the Return and R+1.  When serving, she made 5 errors on the S+1.  This is certainly a place to look when making adjustments and training on the practice court.  Combining the Serve and Return, Juvan made 15 errors in the (0-4) phase of the point and 8 errors in the (5-8) phase of the point.  Training these two phases of a point can make the difference between winning 6-4 and losing 4-6.  Juvan executed better in these phases of point play in this match than her opponent.

Congratulations to you, Kaja Juvan, on your impressive win at the 2016 Orange Bowl!

juvan-orange-bowl-2016

Flow To Play Your Best

Flow, in the simplest of terms, is an optimal state of consciousness.  When in a ‘play state’ we are free to perform our best.  In 7 On Court Strategies To Experience Your ‘Play State’,  I share innovative challenges that engage and assist you in finding your zone.  Playing more often in the zone increases your chances for better outcomes.

I have witnessed, over the past 20 years of coaching, that players who embrace risk often push through and win every time they play.  They may not win on the scoreboard in every match, but they develop towards greatness.  My players often breakthrough to play better than they ever imagined.  Time and time again they find joy and fulfillment in the journey, transforming their game to experience their best performance while on the court.

Play Patterns That Work

There are many different types of patterns of play in the game of tennis.  How can we improve the efficiency with which we recall and employ different patterns of play.  Many of the patterns of play that I have seen from others and taught previously myself, are not altogether logical or easy to recall. We as players begin with good intentions to stick to our patterns of play, but then there are many factors that cause us to forget our plans for play. One of the most important factors are the feelings of pressure we feel when we compete.  Yes, pressure, that ugly word that creeps into our minds and ruins the calm demeanor we want to maintain throughout the entire match.  In the spirit of play patterns that work, we can bridge a sometimes overwhelming gap between the ability to make decisions in the moment of play and preplanned decisions that happen before the first ball is played.

There are some best practices in doing our preplanning, including simplifying and chunking.  Chunking is the strategy of breaking down strings of information into bite-sized pieces so the brain can process more easily and faster.  One of the main reasons the brain needs this assistance is because working memory, which is the temporary workspace where we control and process information, holds a limited amount of information at one time.  Think of working memory as equivalent to being mentally online.   

Simplifying and chunking is a powerful way to remember and recall information, in this case patterns of play, quickly and effectively.  Word choice matters in how we present strategy, because we want our words to express as concisely as possible the meaning we want without sacrificing important details. We remember ideas or patterns better in story form, so why not tell a story about how you are going to play patterns in your next match. By telling a story I am emphasizing a meaningful connection between playing shots to move an opponent wherever and however I’d like.  A story as beginning, building, and finishing (ending) parts – if someone asks you how did you play that match the other day, you could recall the match in story-form.  For example, I started the match by running my opponent side to side, then I discovered they did that really well so I began to reverse and cage them keeping them unbalanced and disturbing their rhythm and timing.  It was great, I felt like a puppet master just directing my opponent’s every move.

Run, Cage, Reverse.  I use three words combined in 2-shot play patterns, to tell a specific story about how a player will dictate a point and control their opponent.   Run as an action shows that the opponent will be moving in every direction.  When you run a player you are pressuring their movement.  The player will “run” a player in a certain direction, side-to-side, up-and-back, angle-to-angle.  To Cage works on the opponent to keep them contained.  When they are “caged” – their movement is limited!  Here the player restricts the time and space of another player has to perform a task with freedom.  Another way to understand it is to “hand-cuff” or “jam” an opponent.  Reversing a player means that a player will intentionally create situations where they can make an opponent run in one direction, then reverse their direction 180 degrees.  When you reverse a player, you are disrupting their balance and rhythm.  For example, when the player hits a ball deep in the corner, and the opponent is resetting to the center, the player will hit right back to the same corner. This is also known as ‘hitting behind the opponent.’  When the player was running forward for a drop-shot, you hit a lob over their head and reversed them to retrieve the shot.

Play patterns that work made up of simple word associations that tell a particular story of ways to win points.  There are nine 2-shot play patterns that work:

1.  Run / Run

2.  Run / Reverse

3.  Run / Cage

4.  Reverse / Run

5.  Reverse / Reverse

6.  Reverse / Cage

7.  Cage / Run

8.  Cage / Reverse

9.  Cage / Cage

Two shot patterns can be used discover quickly in a match your opponents strengths and weaknesses that relate to movement, time and space, as well as rhythm and balance.  Challenging a player in these areas at the right moment can cause a massive shift in momentum and flow of a match.  For example:  Its pretty important to cage a good player when they run you to the outside of the court.  In effect, you neutralize the point by playing back deep to the middle and taking away your opponents ability to hit an angle back to make you run again.  The key phrase here is “deep to the middle”, a short response or deep angle will give your opponent the opportunity to change direction on you – now you are running and reacting.  My #1 player on my high school team who is Top 10 in North Carolina played a Top 10 in South Carolina pre-season tournament finals.  The main reason my player won the match in the end was she caged her opponent who ran side-to-side very well.  My player neutralized her opponent and many times forced her on the defense after being caged.  A Cage/Run pattern was used to dictate the points.  Testing a player’s movement is one of the first ways to determine the athleticism of your opponent.  It’s one of the first strategies I have players initiate with their opponents to see if they can play the ball on the run.  One thing to have good technique, quite another to be able to maintain that good technique while playing a shot on the run.  I had an adult player who came to me and wanting to beat a certain player who just seemed to be able to hit that perfect lob every time.  My question to her was, “Can they hit that perfect lob while on the run?”  The player responded, “Hmmm, I never thought of making her hit the lob on the run.”  Yes, challenge the player with perfect technique – make them run!  Luring your opponent first by running them can set up the reverse pattern.  Reversing a player calls out their agility skill of quickness and balance.  Change of direction requires a player to sustain balance and counter-balance while moving to play the ball.  Some players may guard the reverse pattern too much and that opens up for the run while other players take off to soon to run and then the reverse catches them off balance.  I was coaching another Top 20 player from South Carolina and her ability to bait-and-switch, run/reverse or reverse/run players was her advantage.  She has begun to beat players more regularly in the Top 10 because of this two-shot pattern sequence.  It was discovered in my conversations with my player that so many of the top players in the State moved extremely well from corner to corner.  When faced with the decision to anticipate the run or the reverse, the ability to change direction was the difference between winning and losing points.

Why do I recommend two shot patterns?  Two shot patterns help players stay in the present moment. When players think too far ahead or with too much detail, they get caught up somewhere other than executing their shot.  Ideally the player’s mind will be as quiet as possible as they play. A quiet mind is one of the hallmarks of a play state mind. We want our players to stay in the Flow State for as long an extended period of time as possible, and with minimal breaks in flow.  Not only does this calm your thinking and keep it simple to execute, it lines up with the data as described in greater detail in the chapter First Strike Tennis.  Rally length data as displayed in this chapter “First Strike Tennis” is the foundation by which these Run/Cage/Reverse 2-shot play patterns were developed.  The patterns compliment the idea that points are short on average at every level of play and the easier it is to remember and recall your plan, the better your chances of winning the point.  As more data continues to be collected from every level of play including National Juniors 12 – 18, High School Tennis, Collegiate Tennis, and the Professional Tours that 55-70% of all points end in 0-4 shots.  The ability to simplify and recall mindful play patterns that tell a story while in the moment will likely lead to maintaining and prolonging longer cycles of your play state, or playing in the zone.

Chapter: ‘Play Patterns That Work’ from my new book

7 On Court Strategies To Experience Your ‘Play State’ – How To Win Every Time You Play

coach on court. 2016